Linux? What Linux?

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(This post is geared towards musicians who are not yet familiar with using Linux for music production - or Linux in general for that matter.)
If you want to start working with Linux, it is important to realise that in most cases you don't install Linux itself. Instead you install a Linux distribution. A distribution is a 'package' containing a Linux kernel (the core of the system), device drivers, an installation utility, a graphical user interface, resources for installing applications, etc. Basically the creators of the distribution have made a lot of choices for you to make your life easier. And there are quite a few different distributions, hence the title of the article, which you can now read as: "Linux? Which distribution?" Here's how to go about selecting a distribution...

Welcome to 'Linux for Music'!

"Is it feasible to use Linux for Music?" That is the question I will try to answer on this site. And I don't mean using Linux for playing back music, but as the sole operating system for professional musicians: Linux Music Production (hence the domain name). Music production on the Mac and Windows platforms is already well established. You only have to think of the "world dominance" of ProTools for an example. Or Cubase, Logic, Finale and Sibelius, to name a few. And Linux on the other hand has a strong foothold in other parts of the computer world. The Apache server is a very good example of this. The mainstream applications in the Open Source community are as good as their commercial counterparts for most users (OpenOffice, Gimp), so Linux has become a viable alternative to Windows and Mac in many parts of the computer landscape. So is the time now right to see if Linux is ready for professional music production? ...

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